Fabric Bunting Tutorial

Today I am working hard on projects to get done before we head out on a spur of the moment vacation, so I thought I’d bring home another tutorial I did last year for Go To Sew! I know it’s a repeat, but I’ve got some other fun things in the works to share so just bear with me!  A fabric bunting! Quick and easy! A sweet thing to hang in the house or give as a baby gift (or any sort of gift for that matter)!

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I made a bunting a LONG time ago and I made it too big! But this version is a smaller one with a little something extra. Quilting! Recently a colleague asked me to make one, so I did! And I thought I’d tell ya how I made it so you can make your own!

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The materials you need… You’ll need fabrics for the bunting pieces and fabric for the binding, a cutting tool, pinking shears, and batting. And if you’re wanting to add letters you’ll also need something like heat and bond (two sided fusible adhesive) and your letters. The pattern for the triangles is here.

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step 1- Cut and cut and cut! Your fabric and your batting into triangles.

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step 2- Stack your bunting pieces. Lay the back side right side down, then your batting and then your front side right side up.

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step 3- Sew the three pieces together on the two long sides. You don’t need to sew the top side.

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step 4- Trim the two sewn sides with pinking shears.

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step 5- If you’d like to add letters you can here. Iron on the interfacing to the back of the fabric you want the letters cut out of. Then trim the fabric to the right size of the letter. remove the backing from the interfacing. Then iron on the letter. Depending on the interfacing you use, you can stop here if it’s a no sew interfacing.  If it’s a sew on interfacing, topstitch now.

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step 6- Now for the binding. You could use premade binding if you’d like. Or you can make your own. I cut two inch strips, sew-ed them together at an angle and then folded it in half and ironed. Then folded the sides in again and iron again. And lastly, sew it to the flags.

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And you’re done! See? Simple! What fabrics would you use? What occasion would you make one for? Enjoy!

Sew Ready to Play Checkers with Sugar Bee Crafts

Today my special guest is Mandy from Sugar Bee Crafts! I’ve been following her blog for a long long time. I can’t even remember how I found out about it, but it doesn’t matter how. It matters that it’s very cool, with all sorts of sewing and craft projects. And some of my favorite sewing projects she does are her Halloween costumes! It’s not one costume here or there! It’s the whole family dressed as a theme! Love it! I can’t wait to see what they are planning for this Halloween! But in the meantime…..

Welcome Mandy!!

Hi Everyone!  I’m Mandy and I blog over at the super-cool blog, Sugar Bee Crafts – come see me over there!  I enjoy all things crafty, including sewing and games so of course I jumped at the chance to be a part of this series that puts the two together.  I tried to think of the most popular game at our house, which by far is checkers.  They all LOVE it!  And so I dreamed up the Checkers Skirt:

This would be super-easy to make if you had some large checkered fabric on hand.  But I didn’t.  It still wasn’t hard – let me walk you through it.

First I cut the black and the white fabric into 4 inch strips:

And I sewed them back together, alternating colors, like so:

Then, I turned those sewed strips on their side and again cut 4 inch strips, as shown:

Then I sewed those strips back together, being sure to stagger the black and white to make the checkerboard effect.  I cut off any excess to make a large rectangle and then sewed the short ends together (right sides together) to make a big tube/skirt form.

I made a casing at the top and inserted elastic:

And I serged (you could zig zag) the bottom hem and then covered it with some cute red lace as a fun accent:

For the pocket that plays off of a round checkerpiece, I cut 2 circles (just trace something you have sitting around, like a lid)

Then I sewed those two circles with right sides together, leaving an opening that is an inch or two wide.  Clip all around the seam to help it lay flatter, then turn the circle right-side out through the hole.

Sew it to the skirt, leaving the top of the circle unattached so that it will function as a pocket.

I love how it came out!!  Simple, but really makes a statement, and has a definite shout-out to our love of checkers!

Hope to see you over at Sugar Bee Crafts!

Craft Blogger

Sew Ready to Play Pick Up Sticks

Yea! We’re on! Another series of Sew Ready to Play starts now!! Starting with Pick Up Sticks!

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I’ve realized two things about myself and this series. The first one is I make actual games! I invite everyone and tell them to make something ‘inspired by’ their favorite games. Me. I seem to make the actual game! Last year I made a Memory game. This year a giant sized Pick Up Sticks! The second thing… We always seem to come up with the game while we’re camping. I have to say that the family helps me come up with my games!

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We have had some fun with this one!

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So you throw them up as high as you can…

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Watch them drop! And of course, if they fall on you, they don’t hurt!

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And then play the game!

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They are super simple to make! I’ll show you how. All you need is different colored fabrics, a cutting device, the pattern and some stuffing (ok, a lot of stuffing that I forgot to put in the picture!).

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First, Fold your fabric. First in half, so that the seam allowances are together. Then over again.

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Secondly, lay out the pattern. Make sure the two sides that say to cut on fold are situated correctly on the folds.

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The third step is to cut. After I cut, I was sure I had done it wrong, so don’t get nervous! Just unfold and you should have exactly the right pieces!

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Fourth.. Sew the ends and the one side that isn’t the fold. Don’t forget to leave a hole for pulling through and stuffing.

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The fifth step is to trim the ends to help get the pointy-est ends possible.

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The sixth step is to pull it through itself, so right sides are out.

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Seventh Step- Stuff! This is where the whole process slows down a bit. And here are a couple of tips for stuffing the very ends. Don’t use a lot of stuffing at first. And secondly, I used my frixion pen to really get it in the tip. Other pens and sticks kinda go right through the stuffing. But I think maybe it’s the eraser at the end, but it really helps get the stuffing into the very tip.

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The last step is to hand stitch the hole closed.

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And then repeat! Over and over!

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And lastly… Take them outside and play!

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And if you decide you’re tired of playing pick up sticks you can always have a super skinny pillow fight!

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Or you can pretend you’re a multi colored banana….

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And for the Pick Up Sticks Container and lid, we used a concrete forming tube  and wrapped it in poster board. Is Pick Up Sticks a favorite in your house?

SRTP-2013

La Petite Pouch Tutorial at Go To Sew

La Petite Pouch!

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I needed a little special something to send to someone and I thought and thought about it. I almost just bought something. but then realized the error of my ways and decided to make something. And that’s where the La Petite Pouch was created!

Be sure to head over to Go To Sew to find out how easy it is to make your own!

 

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Sew Ready to Play Backgammon with The Long Thread

I have some good and bad news… We’ll start with the bad… I’m sad to say, but today is the last day of the series… ahhhh… Enough about that! The good news… We have a great guest, Ellen from The Long Thread!! Ellen has a fantastic blog, fantastic fabrics and a great book, 1, 2, 3 Sew! I was lucky enough  to win a copy of this really cool book and I have to say it does have some great projects in it! I’ve been a fan of Ellen’s work for some time now and throughly enjoy reading her blog. You can only imagine how stoked I was to find my Magnetic Bookmark listed among her Top 100 Tutorials of 2011. Wow! :) Yes, I was blushing! If you haven’t checked out her blog before now, you must! Well, after you read this…

And Welcome, Ellen!!!

Thanks to Louise for inviting me to be part of her clever Sew Ready to Play series! Today I’ve made a skirt inspired by the playful geometry of a backgammon board, which makes me want to actually get the game and teach my kids to play. I remember playing as a kid and think I loved the board as much as the game. This simple elastic waist skirt fits sizes 4-6, but could easily be adjusted to other sizes, even for adults! Use the triangle template to make patchwork for a quilt, a tote bag or placemats. If you want to be more faithful to the backgammon design, you could use two solid shades of fabric for the triangles and even make two bands of triangles facing one another.

 
This skirt was made with my new fabric collection for the Japanese company, Kokka, which will be available in stores in early 2013. Here I used this linen/cotton blend with a lightweight gray chambray cotton. This graphic skirt is perfect for fall paired with tights and boots, but light enough to wear year-round. Happy sewing!
Click here for the directions!
And you can check out another version of the skirt at Moda Bake Shop!
BIO:
Ellen Luckett Baker is author of The Long Thread, where she writes about her adventures with sewing, crafting, and kids. Her book 1, 2, 3 Sew was recently published by Chronicle Books and her follow-up book, 1, 2, 3 Quilt, will be released Fall 2013. She has designed two fabric collections; the first for Moda, which is in stores now and the second for Kokka, which will be available in early 2013. Ellen lives in Atlanta with her husband, two daughters, and a growing number of pets.

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Sew Ready to Play Impossible Mission with Cook, Clean, Craft

Ready for another installment of Sew Ready to Play??? Today we have Narelle from Cook Clean Craft! If you’ve followed this blog for a little while, you know Narelle and I have become blogging buddies and she’s visited over here a couple of times now and I’ve made a few of her projects! I love the Men’s Jeans to Toddler pants which made some super adorable pants for my kiddo! You’ve got to check out her blog if you haven’t already! So many more tutorials and fun for the boys.

Welcome Narelle!

Hi, I’m Narelle from Cook Clean Craft. After making UNO shorts for Sew Ready to Play last year (I still love them and they still fit – yay!), I really had to wrack my brain to come up with another game. I started thinking back to games I played when I was a kid, and suddenly this popped into my head:

“Another visitor? Stay awhile…Stay Forever” (in a very sinister voice!)

The introduction to the game “Impossible Mission” on Commodore 64, and so the Commodore 64 T-shirt was created:

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Yes, I was a bit of a geek (hang on, I still am…), and loved playing Ghostbusters, Le Mans car racing and Barbie and more on our family Commodore 64.

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(Scary to think how much more powerful his toy Leap Pad is!)

I remember the fights my brother and I had playing the C64 version of Monopoly (he’d  sell all my property to himself for $1 when I wasn’t looking). Aaah, the memories!

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So how did I make it? I used the Raw Edge Raglan T-shirt pattern from the book “Sewing for Boys”. I had the some knit fabric in my stash that was the perfect Commodore 64 screen blue, and some white ribbing (I’m trying really hard to stash-bust at the moment!).

I embellished the front and one sleeve before I did the sewing – freezer paper stencilling for the front (no fancy cutting machine here – it was all hand-cut with an exacto knife – why do I always pick such fiddly designs (like this and this)?).

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I made an applique for the sleeve from fabric scraps in my stash – using heat’n’bond lite and a satin-stitch (narrow and short zigzag) around the edge.

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(a little wonky – don’t look too closely!)

I didn’t exactly follow the pattern for the T-shirt – I just can’t do the raw-edge thing… So I sewed it together with my serger with right sides together (after almost throwing it through the window when I decided to change threads – I’ve never had a problem threading it before, but it was up for a fight this time!), and hemmed the sleeves and bottom. I bravely did some contrasting top-stitching too.

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And we ended up with a cute geek T-shirt (for a cute Little Man who didn’t want to model!):

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Thanks for inspiring me again, Louise. For more fun crafty projects, head over to Cook Clean Craft. And a parting question: Are we cruel to force our geekiness onto our children?

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Curtains are so Easy Tutorial

If you are a sew-er you already know how easy curtains can be! If you are starting to sew, let me tell ya something… Curtains are so Easy! When friends ask for a sewing favor, I’m always happy to help with curtains. Why? because they are so easy!

Some friends once asked me to make cushion covers… It took me a couple of years. They were big and they intimidated me. They did finally get their cushions, but just think… If only they had asked for curtains! Anyway… Once again I digress!

Do you want to know how I make curtains?? Well, since you’re hear, I’m gonna tell ya!

Step 1: Gather materials. easy. Fabric, thread and a cutting utensil are all ya need!

Step 2: Cut! Which also means measure… You need the width and height of your window. The width is the easy part, double the width! So if your window is 20 inches, you need 40 inches of fabric. If you want 2 panels, you’ll have (2) 20 inch panels. For the height, add 7 inches to the desired finished height. The 7 inches is for a typical skinny curtain rod. If your rod is thicker, then you’ll need to add more length depending on the thickness of the rod.

Step 3: Sew sides. Fold over a 1/2 inch and fold over a 1/2 inch again. I use hair clip to hold the hem in place, but you can pin if you’d like. Mostly I don’t do either, but this is a longer curtain, so it helped. And then stitch.

Step 4: Sew top. Like the sides, you want to start with a 1/2 inch fold over and another 1/2 inch fold over. Stitch that hem. Then fold over 1 1/2 inches and stitch again. A little tip…. When I’m sewing a wide hem, I always put down a piece of painters tape to help me stay straight!

Step 5: Sew the bottom. Fold the hem over 2 inches and turn the corners over 45 degrees. Then fold it over 2 inches again. And stitch. I like to add a little rectangle detail at the corners to help keep down the 45 degree fold.

And Wah-la! Now see… so Easy!!

ok, I have to admit something… These curtains aren’t actually made for this window! You were probably thinking they look a little short, huh??? Well, yes, for this window they are short. But for the window they are actually made for, they fit perfect! I can hear the sigh of relief….

Hopefully this helps you overcome any fear of curtains. They really are soooo easy!

 

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No Cut Cuff Hem Tutorial

Does that title make any sense to you??? My husband had a pair of pants that he needed hemmed. I was soooo excited to try this tutorial for hemming pants legs and keeping the original hem stitching by Just Something I Made. We have a bunch of pants hemmed in our house and the new hem line always bugs me. No matter what thread I use, I still can’t make it look like the original!

As I was pinning my husbands pants he told me that he wanted them hemmed, but long enough to wear them turned up with the cuff. But he also didn’t want them turned up the 4 or 5 inches that he was wearing them!

Soooo…. I couldn’t use the tutorial I wanted to try out, but then it hit me… I could take her idea and use it with a cuff and this is how I did it!

Materials: Too long Jeans, sliding gauge ruler, pins and clear thread and a navy tread (I used the darker thread in the bobbin)

Step 1: Iron the cuff at the length you want the finished pants to be.

Step 2: Fold the extra fabric down into the cuff.

Step 3: Adjust the folded over fabric so that it is the same height all the way around and pin. Align the fold directly beneath the original hem.

Step 4: Sew! Sew as closely to the top of the fold as you can.

Step 5: Iron again and Wah-la!! A folded over cuff look, but no worries that it’s going to fall out! My husband isn’t growing anymore, but if you do this with kids pants, you can let it out as the kiddo grows.

When my husband tried them on, I think I heard him say, ‘They fit perfect. Just how I wanted them.’  Something like that, anyway… Yea!

 

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