Wallet Tutorial

I’ve been away from the blog because…. I’ve been sewing! Love it! Today I’m bringing home a post I did this summer for Busy Being Jennifer blog and going back to the sewing machine!!

Years ago, I found this little vinyl pouch wallet in a shop for almost 30 bucks! As I was talking to the store clerk, I was turning it over, unzipping it, looking inside…. Basically just figuring out how it was made while at the same time chatting away! I paid for what I did buy and I ran home. Ok, I was pretty pregnant at the time, so it’s more like I waddled home than really ran….


That night I told my husband I was going to sew. About 30 minutes later I came up and told him I had just saved almost 30 bucks! Yep, I had made my own wallet!


That was about 6 years ago…. I used it everyday for about 6 years…. Then it started to look like this. Sad, very sad. I kept meaning to make another one and when Jennifer asked me to be a part of her series, it was the perfect excuse to finally make myself a new one! And I thought I’d show you how to make yours!


First you need a vinyl, a zipper, thread, scissors and a cutting device. And you can also add a clip. For the zipper, it doesn’t actually matter what the length is because you will trim the end. I think I used a 7″ zipper. For the vinyl, you’ll need four pieces:

(1) 5×7 inch piece for the back

(1) 3.5×7 inch piece for the front bottom

(1) 1.5×7 inch piece for the front top

(1) .75×4 inch piece for the clip holder

and any additional small pieces to use for embellishing the front or back


First cut out all your pieces.


Secondly, prepare the front. First embelish if you’d like. Originally I had made circle flowers. This time I did little hexagons! And then sew in the zipper. Locate the start of the zipper about half an inch from the side of the wallet. Then sew in the zipper!


Assemble the pieces. Front with the zipper open a bit right side up. Then lay the clip piece over the zipper. And lastly, cover with the back piece, right side down.




Sew all the pieces together using a 1/2 inch seam. And sew over the zipper. When you get to the zipper, move your needle by hand, nice and slow. I go back over my zipper stitches a few times! And then clip the corners!


Turn it right side out and you have a perfect little for all those crazy cards you carry around!


What do you think? Throw away the old one? Oh, yes!


I think the old one held up pretty well for the amount of time I used it! But I’m also pretty happy, more then happy, to have a new one!


Handmade Halloween

Yes, Halloween has come and gone, but I wanted to share the costumes we had this year!


The ‘real’ costume was Ash, the Pokemon trainer, and his Pokemon, Pikachu! We went back and forth and back and forth between costumes. FIrst it was Ash, then Shaggy from Scooby Doo, then another Pokemon character, and back around to Ash!


Do you know Ash? Well, this is what he looks like as a cartoon….


And this is my real life version! As we were trick or treating, kids kept saying Hello to Ash! Then Dad and I were waiting on the kiddo to trick or treat and these older kids came by talking about the kiddos costume. One kid was telling the other kid about how he’d seen the kid in the Ash costume and,

‘It’s so LEGIT, man’

Talk about making a Momma proud! Oh, yeah! The kiddo came back and I told him about the huge compliment he got and he said, ‘What’s that mean?’ Ha! It means you have a really cool Momma that makes you really cool costumes! hehehe!!!


This costume was a mish mash of handmade and not. The coat, totally all handmade. I used the Kitschy Coo Reversible Zippy Hoodie Pattern for the jacket. I got the hat online and painted on the symbol with fabric paint. I was planning on making the pants, but when I found then for ten bucks at Target, I just bought them…. The gloves are half and half! I tried to make my own, but then found some just the right color. I cut them down and added on the red cuffs.


And Pikachu! I made Pikachu! I made a neighbor one a while back using the Ikat Bag’s Menagerie Pattern with a few alternations. And now the kiddo gets his own!


And remember I mentioned Shaggy? Well, the Friday before Halloween school had a Dress Like Your Favorite Book Character Day. Max choose Shaggy from Scooby Doo! Yes, they are books now. He’s become obsessed with those meddling kids in both book and video form!  And yes, that’s Scooby dressed as a wolf for Halloween! hehehe!


Originally, I was just going to whip up a tshirt for him. Then I headed into Old Navy I just happened to find one last green short sleeved shirt with a V-neck, in his size, for $1.50! Um, can’t pass that up! I very liberally used See Kate Sew’s Surfer Slacks for the bell bottoms. I started at one size of the pattern at hte waist, then just drew the pants out at the knee for the bell bottoms. I should have exaggerated even more….


You aren’t Shaggy without the silly whiskers! And I found the Scooby Snacks at Target!


We had a fun Halloween! The kiddo said it was his best one yet! Awesome! I told him that I hope that when he grows up that he has fond memories of Halloween and being involved with all his custom made Halloween costumes. And I told him, if he has a wife that doesn’t sew, that means he has to make his kids costumes! I hope so!


A Ghostly Pillow and a Giveaway!

I’m so excited about 2 things! One, I made a new Halloween pillow! And two, I got to review a fantastic pillow from Pillowcubes!


First, What do you think about the ghost? Like I’ve said, I love Halloween. Last year it was bats…This year ghosts… I’m going to tell more about the quilt block this weekend, so stay tuned!


And now… I’m so spoiled! When I usually buy pillow inserts they are not fancy from a big box store that I won’t name… But I don’t know if I can go back! The pillow that Pillowcubes sent me is the 90/10 Down Feather pillow and it’s AMAZING! So different from those others that I usually get! It’s just soft and cuddly. Perfectly made. And it looks perfect in my pillowcase!


I recently posted about the American Made Brand and how it’s made in the USA. Well, so are Pillowcubes. They are made by real hands right here in the US in Tennessee! So cool!


When I first started talking to Pillowcubes, they only shipped by the case. I don’t know about you, but I don’t typically make that many pillows at once. But the super cool thing is that now you don’t have to buy by the case! You can order just one if you want just one! And I recently priced it out to those other big box stores and to order the same pillow online was a couple of dollars less then buying at the store. And to be buying handmade from a real person…. Can you guess where my next pillow form is coming from?


I always see design shows where they hand chop the pillows. You know what I’m talking about right? With the hand chop? Most of mine don’t really take the hand chop well. But this one does! Oh, yeah!


Now the fun stuff! You can enter to win your very own pillow from Pillowcubes and feel as spoiled as I do! (the giveaway is for the pillow only, not the pillow cover!) And you can order your own pillows right now with the coupon code FeelinCrafty10 to receive 10% off your purchase! Oh, yeah! That’s for everyone!

Ready to WIN? You have FOUR ways to enter! And come back and leave a separate comment on this post for each entry!

1. Tell us your favorite PillowCubes! What’s your favorite size pillow? What’s your favorite stuffing?

2. My blog followers get an extra entry. Leave one comment. (one entry)

3. Follow I’m Feelin’ Crafty on Instagram at @imfeelincrafty. Leave one comment. (one entry)

4. Follow Pillowcubes on Facebook. Leave one comment. (one entry)

That’s 4 possible entries! You must comment on this post to win. Sorry, only open to US addresses. The giveaway will close on October 30th at 12 p.m. PST, and we’ll choose one winner using Random.org.

I have been compensated with either payment or product for this post. All opinions are my own, honest opinions!

American Made Brand Tiny Quilt Challenge

Did anyone else participate in the American Made Brand Tiny Quilt Challenge???


At first I wasn’t going to participate. You saw my fourth quarter goals right???? I have enough on my plate already! But… I love supporting local, so I’ve always loved Clothworks, the brand behind the American Made Brand. And who can’t love American Made fabric? One of the owners came to our guild and showed us the step by step process in making this brand and it’s quite amazing! And frustrating to see how much of our natural resources get exported for us to then buy back! But that’s a whole ‘nother blog post!


And at our Pacific Northwest Modern Quilt Guild meetup, there was this adorable little mini charm pack in our swag bags. So I had to go for it! I had a different idea to start, more of a spiral, but it didn’t turn out…. So this is what I ended up with. Not truly original, and that probably has one thing to do with why it didn’t win anything….


I still didn’t have my own machine back yet and was using a machine that wasn’t real into the curved quilting. So it didn’t end up great there either… But I love the pattern! I wanted to contrast the squares and triangles with circles.


The back is pretty simple and used a couple of extra half square triangles! And I also won a giveaway of American Brand green solids that I put to use on the back.


Don’t look too closely, this one is not my usual quality of piecing or quilting, but…. I don’t have much wall space for mini quilts, so I like to use them for other things. I made this with two layers of batting to use for a hot pad. Even if I didn’t win, it was a fun little project!

Hopscotch with The Shaffer Sisters

Can you believe the series is almost over again!!? Where does the time go? Our last guest is Al, from the Shaffer Sisters! If I had a sister, I hope we’d do as many fun things together as the ladies behind the Shaffer Sisters blog!  They seem like so much fun and I love how they all craft together! They have been guests before and always make the sweetest dresses! So happy to have them back this year! Welcome Al!

This year when I considered the possibility of games I could choose from, I found myself daydreaming of simpler days. I remember spending hours upon hours outside with my cousins pretending with our red wagon and stick horses, playing hide and go seek, and kick the can at grandma’s house. As I reflected, I realized that this year I wanted my theme for Sew Ready to Play to be more timeless than the projects I’ve done in the past.


Hopscotch is one of those outside games that can be played anywhere with very little effort. A few weeks ago we were sitting on the sidewalk waiting for the local parade to begin when the kids found chalk in the stroller. Before we knew it, there were a few hop scotch designs down and the kids were contently playing instead of impatiently waiting.


I had started out this project with the intent to make another dress for my very girly daughter, but unfortunately the printer was set to fit and not to actual size. I ended up with a dress in which the finished bodice fit my 1 year old daughter instead of my 6 year old. I didn’t realize this until I was practically done and had spent hours embroidering the hop scotch design on the skirt. The simplest thing would have been to just have my baby wear it, but it didn’t seem fitting since there’s no way a baby can hopscotch.

I wanted to recreate the bodice the right size and stick with my original design, but I lacked the emotional energy to invest that much more time into it. So when life gives you lemons make lemonade, right!?

And on that same day her little brother cut some of her hair an inch long

I seam ripped the skirt off the bodice and attached it to some elastic that I’ve been saving for just the right project.

Ty in her hopscotch skirt and Sally in her butterfly tunic and polka-dot leggings

The detail on the skirt was done by lightly sketching the hopscotch design and then going back and adding embroidery thread of different colors.

Skirts that fly are the only way to go for a 5 year old

She is happy because it’s a skirt that flies when she spins and has plenty of room for movement to navigate the playground.

With love,



Bocce Ball with Marci Girl Designs

Today’s guest is Marci, from Marci Girl Designs!!! Another online friend that I can’t wait to meet one day soon! My face to face friend Debbie, introduced us when I was looking for pattern testers and we’ve been online friends ever since! She makes such adorable things for her kiddos and quilts! You’ve got to check her out if don’t already know her! Welcome, Marci!!

Hi Guys!  I’m excited to be here today participating for the first time in Sew Ready to Play.  When I received the invite from Louise I instantly knew what project I wanted to create, Bocce Ball.  You see, back in the day before I had children (about 8 years ago now) my husband and I really got into the game.  We have a large yard, plenty of space and it was really fun to play and in my mind at the time a wee bit of exercise. HA!  The problem started once we had children, if you are at all familiar with the game it uses these really hard heavy balls, and you are chunking them (sometimes pretty far) across the yard.  This isn’t really safe to play around toddlers who want to play too but don’t understand that they can get injured (badly) if hit by one of these balls.  So sadly my husband and I picked up our set waiting for the day when our kids were old enough to understand and play along.  So how do I remedy our predicament?  Fabric Bocce Balls and now we can even play indoors!  Woohoo!  For any of you not familiar with Bocce Ball or want to know the rules of the game, click HERE for the basics and images of how the game plays.

23 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

3.5″ Fabric Bocce Ball Tool and Supply Lists

Tools Needed:
Paper, Pen, Sewing Machine, Thread, Pins, Scissors, Ruler, Rotary Cutter, Self Healing Cutting Mat

Supplies Needed:
Drafted template onto paper.
6 fabric prints/solids for each ball, cutting 2 pentagons from each fabric for a total of 12 for each ball.
Iron on interfacing scraps, I used Pellon SF-101 in both black and white.
Fiberfill or Batting Scraps

How to Draft the Pentagon Template:

How to Create Pentagon

I wanted to include a PDF download template file for you guys, but alas my scanner decided to HATE me and isn’t working right now, but that is ok because I can easily show you how to draft the template yourself.  All you need is a piece of paper, pen and a ruler (preferably a quilters ruler that has both parallel and perpendicular lines on it.)

1.  Draw a dot, which will be the top of the pentagon.  Draw a line straight down from the dot that measures 3 1/8.”  Next draw a perpendicular line at the bottom that measures 2″.  This line should be centered with 1″ on either side.  Draw two dots, one on each end of this line.
2.  Measure up 2″ from the bottom line and draw a line that is perpendicular with the center line.  This line should measure 3 1/8″ and should be centered just like the bottom line.  Since this measurement is a bit odd, I just measured over 1 1/2″ and then marked 1/16″ over from that.  Do that on both sides and then check to make sure the overall line measures 3 1/8″.  Draw two dots, one on each end of this line.
3.  Now that you have 5 dots, ignore everything else and just connect the dots.  Voila!  You now have a finished pentagon template.  To double check and make sure everything is the correct size, each side of the pentagon should measure right at 2″.  Trust me, if the measurement is a little off, you will still be fine.  Now cut out the template and move on to the next step.

3.5″ Fabric Bocce Ball Cutting and Interfacing Instructions

1 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

In order to play Bocce Ball, you need 8 balls, 4 for each player.  In a normal set, 4 of the balls are red and 4 of the balls are green.  I decided to change things up and instead made a cool color and warm color set.  Originally I thought of using prints but in the end thought solids would be fun and less distracting.  You can see in the above photo my fabric pull for the 8 balls.  You need to have 6 different colors for each ball if you don’t want any duplicate colors or prints touching each other.

2 and 3 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

I didn’t worry with making the template on card stock, as long as you don’t cut the actual paper, it will be fine, you don’t have to be super accurate when cutting out the pentagons, just close enough.  The above left photo shows that I am using scraps.  I then line up my ruler along the edge of the template and cut with a rotary cutter.  Continue for each side just making sure not to cut the paper.  You can see on the right photo that I’m not even that close to the paper.  You need to cut 12 pentagons for each ball, ideally in 6 different prints/solids.

4 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

The next step is key to getting a nice sturdy, tough and smooth ball.  You need to interface each piece.  So I used Pellon Shapeflex 101, which is an iron on interfacing.  As you can see I used scraps, they don’t have to be perfect and it is better to cut the pieces about 1/8″ smaller than the fabric.  This is also beneficial when Ironing as you have less chance of getting glue on your iron or ironing board.  I used both black and white interfacing.  White on the light colors and dark on the dark colors.  I also used the interfacing to create a subtle difference between solids that are really close in color.  For example the two orange pentagons were very close in color, the top has black interfacing and the bottom has white interfacing.  Notice how it creates a greater color difference between the two, subtle but different.  Now that cutting and interfacing are finished let’s get to sewing these babies!

3.5″ Fabric Bocce Ball Sewing Tutorial

Steps 1 through 4 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

1.  You will be using a 3/8″ seam throughout.  You need to mark (I use the pins) 3/8″ in from each side.  Line up two pentagons, right sides together and pin them together.  Since I put these pins in at 3/8″ I just stitch from pin to pin.  Another crucial feature of making these balls sturdy is to lower your stitch length.  I used 1.5, it is a small stitch.  Back stitching at both ends is crucial, don’t forget to do this every time.  Remove pins.
2.  Open up the two pentagons and finger press the seam to the left.  Taking a third pentagon, right sides together, pin right where the seam is in the middle and pin the other end at 3/8″.  Stitch, remembering to back stitch at both ends.
3.  Open up the three pentagons.  Now here is the tricky or neat part, you need to connect these three pentagons together.  Gently rotate the upper right pentagon over onto the upper left pentagon. As seen on the green fabric that I am holding.
4.  Now pin these two together.  3/8″ in from the left side and then put a pin right where the other seam ends.  You can see I have this pin at an angle, be careful not to catch the fabric that is sandwiched in there because it is neatly tucked inside.  Stitch, back stitching at both ends in between the two pins.  Remove pins, open up and you should have three pentagons neatly stitched together like the blue one I am holding.  Congratulations if you can get this far, you can make a fabric ball and you have successfully sewn a Y seam!

Steps 5 through 8 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

5.  Decide which pentagon you want to act as the “middle” pentagon and orient it on top.  Take a forth pentagon, pin (right sides together) right at the middle seam (finger press that seam upwards towards the top pentagon) and then pin the outer edge 3/8″ in.  Stitch.
6.  Remove pins, open up and it should look like the upper aqua set that I am holding.  You will then do the same neat rotating trick (the same as step #3) and attach the newly sewn forth pentagon to the now designated middle pentagon.  Pinning and stitching in the same manner as all the others.  Remembering to always finger press that back seam out of the way and not catching any of that sandwiched fabric.  Once finished you will have 4 pentagons sewn together.
7.  Taking a fifth pentagon, add it to the top of the forth pentagon, sewing the same way as all the others.  Open it up and it will look like the top blue set.  Then repeat that neat little rotating trick to stitch it onto the middle pentagon.  You should now have a middle pentagon and 5 other pentagons attached with just one opening as shown on the bottom pink set.
8.  This is what step #7 looks like when you rotate it to stitch it onto the middle pentagon.

Steps 9 through 12 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

9.  Now close up that one last opening.  Rotate the right side pentagon onto the left side opening, right sides together, pin and stitch in the same manner as all the other seams.  Be careful not to catch any of the fabric or back seams.  Remove pins, open it up and it should look like this photo, which is now exactly half of the ball.  You will need to create the other half of the ball, so repeat steps 1-9.
10.  You now have 2 ball halves that you need to stitch together.  Rotate the halves around until you have no prints/same colors touching.  The key to joining the two halves together is to remember that the peaks join into the valleys as shown in the photo.  The upper half (peak) nestles into the lower half (valley.)
11.  Pin, finger pressing the left seam in the back towards the left and finger pressing the right seam to the right as shown in this photo.  Stitch.
12.  Continue to stitch around the whole ball, one short seam at a time, finger pressing the seams out of the way.  Stitch all nine joints, leaving the tenth open.  You can see in the photo I have my finger stuck in the opening, leave it un-sewn as this is where you will turn the ball right side out.

17 and 18 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

Two techniques that I found helpful: 
1.  Once you have sewn all your seams and are ready to turn the ball right side out.  I found clipping the corners 1/4″ in on every intersection produced a smoother ball in the end.  I didn’t trim the seams, it wasn’t necessary.  You can see my clipped seam in the left photo above.
2.  Another key to stitching these and having a smooth ball with no tucks or puckers can be seen on the photo to the right.  When stitching each separate seam make sure you don’t overlap your stitching and you don’t even have to meet the adjacent stitched seam, it is better if you don’t.  You can see in the photo that my seams are about an 1/8″ away from each other.  I even messed up that top seam by starting out at 3/8″ and then gradually shifting to 1/4″ (old habits.)  You can see I just left it and restitched the seam correctly.  By leaving that little bit of space you are making sure not to catch other bits of fabric on the inside and creating tucks.  When in doubt, leave the space!  This is not the type of project where you have to be precise.

19 and 20 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

Turn the ball through that little opening (yes it requires some work, pulling and a lot of tugging but it will work.)  You can see all eight turned above and you can see the opening really well on the yellow one  Now it is time to stuff them.  Stuff them really full, I mean really full, tight as you can stuff it!  This is a great project to use up all those random batting strips and scraps you have laying around, just stuff them in.  If you don’t have that, just use Fiberfill, one bag was plenty for all eight with leftovers.  Once it becomes too hard to put anymore filling inside it, you are ready to stitch it closed.  I used matching polyester thread (it is stronger) and stitched using a ladder stitch 1/8″ apart just to get the opening closed.  There will be some gaping and it won’t look wonderful.  I then went back over the seam a second time with a whip-stitch just catching both sides and stitching as close together as I could, pulling tightly.  You can see my stitching on the right photo.  Knot off the end with your preferred method and clip the thread.  Keep in mind this is for children to play with, it doesn’t need to be perfect, they won’t mind.

21 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

Congratulations!  You are finished and now have a neat hand made fabric ball.  Stuff and hand stitch the remaining balls until you have a set of eight.  Play ball!

22 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

Now if you have a good eye you might notice I am missing something, the jack or pallina, which is another small ball that you throw at the beginning of the game, it serves as the target in which you are throwing your larger balls at (or as close as you can get them.)  This ball measures about 2″ in diameter and is too small to sew using this method.  I plan to English Paper Piece this ball and sew it all by hand, but haven’t done that yet.  In the meantime I am just going to let my kiddos use a ping pong ball or another small plastic ball that is lightweight and can’t break anything or hurt anyone.  Not a big deal but I don’t want you to think I forgot about it!

24 Bocce Ball Marci Girl Designs

Louise, thank you for having me.  I truly hope you guys will give this tutorial a try, even if you only make one ball for your kiddos, it is a quick and rewarding project.  Your kids will go nuts for it too, trust me, my oldest has been dying to get his hands on them.

Be sure to stop back by for more!

Sept 7th- Debbie from A Quilter’s Table

Sept 9th- Jennifer from Busy Being Jennifer

Sept 11th- Ari from Max California

Sept 16th- Stacey from Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

Sept 18th- Karly from Paisley Roots

Sept 21st- Louise from I’m Feelin’ Crafty

Sept 23rd- Narelle from Cook, Clean, Craft

Sept 25th- Al from Shaffer Sisters

Sept 28th- Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing

Sept 30th- Marci from Marci Girl Designs

Backgammon with Let’s Begin Sewing

Today we have a new guest to the Sew Ready to Play line-up! Today’s guest is Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing! She is one of my real life quilty friends. We’ve been in the Seattle Modern Quilt Guild together for quite some time and I love what she creates, so I invited her over to play along this year and she agreed! If you haven’t been by her blog, you need to! And be sure to check out all of her amazing quilts.

This year for the first time I am participating in Sew Ready to Play with Louise from I’m Feelin Crafty. She is one of my quilty friends that I actually get to interact with in person.

I am not much into board games, but recently someone gifted me a custom made wooden Backgammon set. It is truly a work of art. Very painfully crafted with neatly polished wooden inlays. I love looking at it more than playing with it. The crisp and clean geometric pattern really gets me. This was the inspiration behind my Backgammon inspired cushion cover.

The cushion cover is foundation pieced. I modified the pattern slightly from the standard Backgammon board design using EQ7. You can download the template here. I limited the color palette to Kona Charcoal and Grass Green by Robert Kaufman. The cushion measures 13″ x 13″ and fits a standard 14″ x 14″ pillow insert.

The quilting is minimal and echoes the paper pieced pattern. For the back I used a zipper flap to cover up the zipper. I used this zipper closure tutorial by Svetlana of Sotak Handmade. It makes up for not having a matching zipper handy :) I used a 12″ zipper for this cushion.

A step really not needed but highly recommended if you plan to wash the cushion cover is to cover up the seams on the inside. I usually bind the seams with home made binding. It does not have to be pretty but goes a long way when washed as it prevents fraying.

Here are some other color options that I considered before settling on this one.

The possibilities are endless.

Leaving off with one last picture, I think it is going to look great on the couch.

Be sure to stop back by for more!

Sept 7th- Debbie from A Quilter’s Table

Sept 9th- Jennifer from Busy Being Jennifer

Sept 11th- Ari from Max California

Sept 16th- Stacey from Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

Sept 18th- Karly from Paisley Roots

Sept 21st- Louise from I’m Feelin’ Crafty

Sept 23rd- Narelle from Cook, Clean, Craft

Sept 25th- Al from Shaffer Sisters

Sept 28th- Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing

Sept 30th- Marci from Marci Girl Designs

Monopoly with Cook, Clean, Craft

Well, this season has seen a couple of scheduling snafu’s! This time, I’m off… My project was scheduled for Monday, but I had some technical difficulties and wasn’t able to get it posted. It’s done and I can’t wait to share, but…. I’ll sneak it in ASAP! Sorry!

BUT ANYWAY… THe real star of the show today is my blogger friend Narelle from Cook, Clean Craft! She’s one of my original Sew Ready to Play guests and I love that she comes back each year! Have you seen her blog? It’s awesome! So much fun stuff for the kiddos. Clothes, toys and even yummy food! But I guess her name could have told you that, huh! She’s inspired a few sewing projects in this house and one of her recipes has become a staple. I think of her every time I make it. One day I want to meet this woman in person! Welcome, Narelle!!!

I’m so happy to be back for another year of Sew Ready to Play. But to start with, let’s get one thing straight.

I HATE Monopoly!

My older brother always wanted me to play Monopoly when we were kids. The games lasted forever, and he always beat me. I remember tears, fist fights and the game board getting flipped over many a time.

When my son took an interest in Monopoly, my heart filled with dread. It’s just about the last game in the world I want to play. My 6 year old son loves numbers and money, so he thinks it’s fantastic (he even spent his pocket money to buy a second game – with electronic banking – because he loves it so much!). I try to avoid playing as much as possible, but sometimes I have to – oh the joys of being a Mother!

Monopoly was the first thing that came to mind for Sew Ready to Play. I thought about clothes for my son, but wasn’t inspired. Then I had the idea to make floor cushions or stools to sit on at our “board game table”. The idea stuck in my head, and before you know it, here’s what I made:

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (26)

They’re a sort of a stool, or a bean bag, or a really tall floor cushion.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (29)

The floor cushions have different properties on the bottom too, to mix things up a bit:

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (32)

After having done some crazy cutting and machine applique in the past, this time around, I cheated and used my Brother Scan’N’Cut for cutting the letters, and Heat’n’Bond Ultrahold so I didn’t have to sew the letters in place. This will be a good test to see how it holds up to two small kids using the cushions.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (3)

I tried to take a photo of my kids using them while playing Monopoly, but it’s a dark room, and my kids won’t stay still, so this is the best I got:


Here’s the tutorial for how to sew monopoly floor cushions or stools – these instruction make 2 floor cushions.


How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (2)

2.5m (2.75 yards) black quilting cotton
1m (1.1 yards) pale green/spearmint quilting cotton
20cm (8”) strip of quilting cotton in red, pink, green and orange
30cm (12”) Heat’n’Bond Ultrahold
7m (7.7 yards) Black Bias Binding
7m (7.7 yards) Piping cord (Size 2)
Scissors, thread, sewing machine
Basting Spray (optional)
Brother Scan’n’Cut (optional)
Beanbag beans, pillows or polyfill to stuff (I’m not sure how much – I stole the beans out of a beanbag that I don’t like!)


Cut a 30cm (12”) by 17cm (7”) strip from each of the colours for the top of the properties (red, green, pink and orange for these ones!).

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (8)

Cut 4 pieces the light green fabric that are 50cm x 30cm (20” x 12”). This is the top and bottom of each floor cushion.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (9)

Spray some basting spray (optional) on the back of the coloured strip, and place on top of one of the light green pieces, lining up the top edge.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (10)

Sew a short zigzag stitch along the bottom of the coloured strip with black thread. I used a stitch length of 0.6 and width of 4.5.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (11)

Attach the Heat’n’Bond Ultrahold to the wrong side of a 30cm x 30cm (12” x 12”) piece of black quilter’s cotton, following the packet instructions.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (15)

Either trace your letters onto the backing paper, and cut out by hand, or use a Brother Scan’n’Cut to cut out the letters. I used the Brother Scan’n’Cut Canvas online app to create the lettering, using a standard font. I also selected the properties with the least number of letters! I had to add lines to an S to create the dollar sign.

My letters cut beautifully – here is what was left of my fabric:

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (14)

Peel the backing paper off the letters, and arrange on the pale green fabric. Iron in place, following the directions on the Heat’n’Bond Ultrahold.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (13)

Repeat for the over 3 light green pieces to make 4 properties in total.

To make the piping, iron the bias binding flat (ie iron out the pre-made folds in it). Fold it in half and place the piping cord against the fold. With a long stitch length, sew the bias binding together close to the cord. Using a zipper foot can help get close to the piping cord.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (4)

Then you should have a long spaghetti of piping:

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (7)

Pin the piping cord around the edge of the right side of the light green fabric, make a small curve at the corners. The raw edges of the base fabric and the cord should line up.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (16)

Where the two ends meet, unpick the basting stitches so you can see the cord.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (17)

Snip the piping cord so there is just enough to go around the outside of the base fabric. Fold over the raw edge of one end of the piping, and then fold that section over the top of the other raw end.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (18)

With a long basting stitch, sew the piping cord into place.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (19)

Cut 4 strips of black fabric that are 50cm (20”) x 76cm (30”). This is for the sides of the two cushions. Sew the 50cm (20”) edges of two pieces together to form a cylinder.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (20)

With right sides together, pin the black cylinder to the pale green fabric, lining up the raw edges.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (21)

Sew in place.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (22)

Repeat for the bottom of the floor cushion, but this time, leave a 15cm gap along one edge.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool (23)

Turn the floor cushion right way out. Fill with beanbag beans, stuffing or pillows, and hand-stitch the opening closed.

How to sew a monopoly floor cushion or stool. Fun sewing tutorial as part of Sew ready to Play.

And there you have a reversible Monopoly-inspired floor cushion or stool.

Thanks again for having me, Louise. For more sewing, craft and homemaking inspiration, head over to Cook Clean Craft.

Be sure to stop back by for more!

Sept 7th- Debbie from A Quilter’s Table

Sept 9th- Jennifer from Busy Being Jennifer

Sept 11th- Ari from Max California

Sept 16th- Stacey from Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

Sept 18th- Karly from Paisley Roots

Sept 21st- Louise from I’m Feelin’ Crafty

Sept 23rd- Narelle from Cook, Clean, Craft

Sept 25th- Al from Shaffer Sisters

Sept 28th- Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing

Sept 30th- Marci from Marci Girl Designs

Pac-Man with Paisley Roots

Today I’m excited to introduce Karly from Paisley Roots. I’ve known Karly for a few years now and am amazed at all the awesome clothes she produces for her kiddos! And herself! Lately I haven’t been able to sew for just one kid, and she sews for all FIVE of her kids! No idea how she does it. Amazing! If you haven’t seen her blog, be sure to check it out. She’s very inspiring! Welcome, Karly!

I’m so excited to be back on Sew Ready to Play again this year! Since last year, I have started to homeschool my kids, so games have become a much bigger thing in our house. If you then throw in my husbands influence of computer and Nintendo games, we’ve got a whole new level of geekiness going on. I’m even going to Comic Con this year and am beyond excited about it!

If you couldn’t already tell, I went with Pacman for our game. My kids haven’t actually played it before, but they love watching the show and it’s one of their favorite characters.

To make Jude’s hoodie I used the Bimaa hoodie (it’s one of my favorites!) Then I just appliqued Pacman and some pac-dots on the front. I traced a paint can for Pac-man. I knew there was a reason I needed to hang onto it!

 I had really wanted to make the other kids ghost hoodies, but life is chaos with homeschool and time got away from me. It’s still going to happen.

Thank you so much for having us Louise!

Be sure to stop back by for more!

Sept 7th- Debbie from A Quilter’s Table

Sept 9th- Jennifer from Busy Being Jennifer

Sept 11th- Ari from Max California

Sept 16th- Stacey from Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

Sept 18th- Karly from Paisley Roots

Sept 21st- Louise from I’m Feelin’ Crafty

Sept 23rd- Narelle from Cook, Clean, Craft

Sept 25th- Al from Shaffer Sisters

Sept 28th- Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing

Sept 30th- Marci from Marci Girl Designs

Othello with Boy, oh Boy, oh Boy Crafts

Welcome to another awesome project for Sew Ready to Play! Today I have a new friend joining us, Stacey from Boy, oh Boy, oh Boy Crafts. I don’t know about you, but there are a lot of kids clothes bloggers out there and it seems like 90% of them sew primarily for girls! It’s kinda like trying to shop for boys clothing, the girls department is as big as the women’s department and the boys get 3 racks. Well… When I find a good boys blogger, I’m smitten! And that’s what I found when I found Stacey’s blog! I love it! She has such great projects for her house of boys. We haven’t gotten to ‘know’ each other too well yet, but I’ve been following her for years and was totally stoked when she agreed to play along! Welcome, Stacey!
DIY Othello Shirt

Hi!  I’m Stacey and I blog over at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts where I design and sew kids clothing and post about activities to keep the kids busy.  I’ve been following along with the Sew Ready to Play series for the last few years and I’m so excited to be here today. I went back and forth between our three favorite board games and finally settled on sharing an Othello inspired project.  I have to admit, my three sons would probably each have chosen a different game but this one is MY favorite.  I can’t tell you how happy I am that the boys have moved past Candyland and Chutes and Ladders. Strategy games are our new passion and you can believe with three boys in the house, things can get pretty competitive.

DIY Othello Shirt tutorial

I used the Bimaa Sweater pattern and altered it just a bit for a tank style sleeve with ribbing but any t-shirt pattern would work here.  I feel a bit silly writing this as a tutorial, considering it’s a pretty straight forward embellishment, but I’ll run your through the basics.

First, use a ruler to measure out your stitching for the game board.  I went with 2 1/2 inch boxes and played a bit with how big I wanted it to be.  In the end, I decided not to stitch the last row of boxes.  One of the great things about a water soluble marker is that you can just dab some water on and away the lines disappear.

Once I had the board set up to my liking, I went ahead and cut out white and black circles from wool felt.


Top stitch along  your marker lines to create the game board.  I used a turquoise thread to mimic the green of the original game board but any color would work. Then I switched to black thread to applique the game pieces in place.  As you can see by a few wrinkles in my board that a tear away stabilizer would have been helpful.  Learn from my mistake, don’t cut corner folks!

Once that’s set, move along to finishing out the rest of the t-shirt steps.  I went with a fun pop of geometric print to line the hoodie and well as some contrast ribbing to add another element of play on the game board design.

It took some time for this game loving kid to pick up on the wax and wane of the game, and how often the “winner” changes hands, but let me tell you, this kid beats my butt more time than not.  His brother’s better watch out because this kid is future Othello World Cup material!

Here’s the list of amazing creators that are playing along this year! Be sure to check out the other game inspired projects.

Sept 7th- Debbie from A Quilter’s Table

Sept 9th- Jennifer from Busy Being Jennifer

Sept 11th- Ari from Max California

Sept 16th- Stacey from Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

Sept 18th- Karly from Paisley Roots

Sept 21st- Louise from I’m Feelin’ Crafty

Sept 23rd- Narelle from Cook, Clean, Craft

Sept 25th- Al from Shaffer Sisters

Sept 28th- Rachel from Let’s Begin Sewing

Sept 30th- Marci from Marci Girl Designs


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