The Eared Earflap Hat! a tutorial

Bringing another tutorial home today! Things are crazy here! I’ve missed sharing with you this week! I’ll be back to normal soon, I hope! But while I’m doing too much at once, why don’t you make a fun hat!!

EarFlapHat-Main-ImFeelinCraftyI was competing in Project Run and Play and got behind in other things. If you are following along this season of Project Run and Play, this hat might look familiar… It’s my ‘Eared’ Earflap hat for the kiddos!

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It’s a quick one that you can do with some larger fleece scraps you might have around the house! All you need is two pieces of fleece (or you could use just one color too) and cutting tools! And you can download the pattern here.

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Step 2: Cut out the pieces. You’ll need 2 of each color/print for the main pieces and the little ears. And a 3 inch strip about 15″ long (you’ll trim this later, so it doesn’t need to be exact!)

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Step 3: Cut the slit in the outside fabric. You can do it on the inside pieces, but I’ve found with fleece that it doesn’t really need the darts on the inside.

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Step 4: Make your ears. Sew the ears together and then turn right side out.

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Step 5: Place the ears in the hat.

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Step 6: Sew it together! First sew the ear slit closed. Then sew the middle 3″ slit between the two side pieces. And sew the middle strip and side pieces of the inside pieces together too.

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Step 7: Trim the excess of the middle piece off. I trim it in a slight curve between the two sides.

Step 8: Put the inside and outside together, one inside the other, with right sides facing.

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Step 9: Sew along the side edge. You do need to leave a hole, about 2 inches.

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Step 10: Optional, but you can trim the curved pieces. With fleece it’s not quite as critical, but if you were sewing it with a different fabric, this really helps to get the fabric to lay flat. Since the fleece kinda stretches around, it’s not as critical.

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Step 11: Pull through the hole.

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Step 12: Hand sew the hole.

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And you’ve got a hat! Pretty easy! It would also be fun to recycle a sweater for this project!

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And what about in green?? Do you see it? A frog hat? hehehe!

It’s a Kid! In a T-shirt! No! It’s a Super Hero! In a Cape!

Does this look familiar? This is a tutorial I did for Go To Sew and I’m bringing it home today!

Every time we go to the Gap outlet my son begs for one of those t-shirts with the capes Velcro-ed to the back. And it’s not just the Gap, they have them other places too. It doesn’t matter where he sees them, but he BEGS for one wherever we are. And I always same the same thing, ‘I can make that for a lot less than 30 bucks!’ We’re kinda like a broken record. Please, I can make that, Please, I can make that, Please… Get the idea?

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So I finally sat down and made him one and he wore it all over town!

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OK, this is super simple and can be done with old t-shirts you have around the house! My son decided he wanted Bat Man with a black t-shirt and yellow symbol and blue cape. Honestly, I didn’t know Bat Man’s cape was actually blue. Yes, my then 4 four-year old son convinced me that he knew what he was talking about. I think he loved saying, ‘See, I told you so!’ when we googled images of Bat Man online!

This tutorial is a two part-er. First we did a freezer paper stencil and then we made the cape.

Materials:

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A blank t-shirt, color corresponding to your super hero of choice.

Fabric for the cape. About a 1/2 yard, or another adult t-shirt.

Freezer Paper

Your Super Hero Icon

Fabric Paint

Spongy Paint brush

Xacto Knife

Paper for making a pattern.

Velcro

Part 1: The Freezer Paper Stencil. I’m going to go over this quick, since it’s easy and I’ve already done a tutorials here

Step 1: Cut your image out of the freezer paper.

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Step 2: Iron it on the shirt with the shiny side down (touching the t-shirt)

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Step 3: Paint! Mine took a few (or more) coats of paint.

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Step 4: Remove the freezer paper!

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Part 2: Make the cape!

Step 1: Make the pattern. Trace the neck and shoulders. The cape will sit up along the neck of the shirt, so we want this shape along the top. Then you decide the length and width! The t-shirts I ‘knocked off’ keep the cape the same length as the t-shirt. We decided to make ours about 3 inches longer. And about 5 inches wider than the back of the shirt.  After a few patterns, I ended up going straight from the shoulder to the edge of the shirt. As in no curves!

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Step 2: Cut the cape.

Step 3: Hem each side of the cape.

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Step 4: Cut your Velcro. I just happened to have color coordinated Velcro! How cool is that??? You don’t need it, but they do have all sorts of colored Velcro out there! Can you tell how excited I was when I found the blue? I already had the black. Ok, OK, OK! Back to the superheroes! Cut your Velcro in 1 1/2″ pieces. Position the Velcro and sew it on both the t-shirt and the cape.

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Step 5: Turn your kid into a Super Hero! Or you, if it’s for you!

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So remember how I said I knew I could do it for less than 30 bucks? Well, the t-shirt was 4, the paint was 1 and the blue Velcro was 1 and I had everything else on hand. So it ended up being 6 bucks! Oh, yeah!

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Which Super Hero would you be??

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Shared with these Link Parties!

Christmas Pot Holder Tutorial

So today let’s take yesterday’s quilt block and turn it into a mug rug or pot holder!! Who doesn’t need a pot holder? Especially with all the holiday baking?? mmmm!

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I recently started making pot holders for gifts and realized they are so simple!! And fun! And prettier than the ones in the stores!

I’ll show you how simple they are to make!

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For the materials, you’ll need your front and backing fabric, a piece of batting and a piece of insulated batting. All these thing are available at the shop, so come on in and we’ll get you are ready!  For the front of mine, I used the tree block I described here.

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Stack your pieces. Start with the backing right side down, then your insulated batting (follow your insulated batting directions, but mine specifies to have the insulated side facing the heat source so I have mine stacked with the insulated side down), then the batting and lastly your top with the right side facing up.

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Quilt the pieces together

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Trim. I made mine a 8×8 inch pot holder, but you can make it any size you’d like.

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Cut your 2″ binding and add an additional 3 inches to your binding piece. This additional 3 inches is for your hanging hook.

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Make your hanging hook. Fold the 3 inch piece in half, right sides together and sew a quarter inch seam. Then flip right side out. Done!

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Add your binding. And don’t forget to insert the hanging hook at the top side while you are adding on the binding.

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And it’s done! It also works for a mug rug…

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And the real question… Are you going to keep it? Or give it away?

The Stay Put Scarf Tutorial

I’m bringing some of my Go To Sew tutorials home this month! And I’m starting with this Stay Put Scarf Tutorial because it’s freezing here and I just stole this one from my son and I love it! (Yes, he has another one… Don’t loose any sleep fearing that he’s out in the freezing cold without the necessary warm things) Also, it’s a quick and easy holiday gift idea!

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My son has been eyeballing scarves, but they are either too expensive, too long for a 4-year-old or something that I know that I can make. So I decided, I’ll just make one! And I’ll make it with a couple of easy enhancements. Every scarf needs a pocket to stash treasures that you find out and about. And a little strap so it stays in place… Hence, the Stay Put Scarf.

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Materials: fabric, cutting materials and tread! I used fleece and minky fabric. That’s it!

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Step 1: Cut the fabric.

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You’ll need:

2 strips of 8×38 inch fabric for the front and back of the scarf.  I made mine for a small 4-year-old, you might want to make yours longer for a larger kid or an adult.

A 2.5×8 inch strip for the strap.

Two pieces of 7×6 inch fabric for the fringe.

And one piece of 7×8 inch fabric for the pocket.

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Step 2: Make the Strap.

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Sew the strap together, with right sides together and then pull it through itself.

Step 3: The pocket.

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All you need to do here is hem one of the 8 inch long sides.

Step 4: Assemble.

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Layout the front side of the scarf, right side up. Center the fringe piece right side down. Add the pocket, right side down. And lastly, add the back side of the scarf, right side down.

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Pin in the strap. I pinned mine 6 inches toward the pocket from the center. Does that make sense? Find the center. Then measure  6 inches toward the pocket end. That’s where the strap goes. Again, like I said earlier, this one is for a small 4-year-old. The placement of the strap might change based on the size of the kiddo.

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Next layer on the other end fringe. Again, right sides together.

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Pin all the layers together for the whole scarf.

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I have this little problem of forgetting to leave holes when I’m sewing things together, so I’ve started adding double pins where I want to leave a hole. Just a little reminder!

Step 5: Sew it all together. (Except between those double pins!)

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Step 6: Trim the corners and pull it all out through the hole you left.

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Typically I’m a top-stitcher. I love to top stitch. EVERYTHING! But not this one. You can, but for some reason on this one, I didn’t feel like it needed it. But do sew the hole closed!

Step 7: Make the fringe.

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I originally told you to make the fringe 6 inches. Now’s the time you decide how long the fringe is actually going to be. I made mine 2.5 inches!

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Then trim the fringe, by cutting into 1/2 strips, but stop the cuts about 1/2 to 1 inch from the end of the scarf.

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And that’s about it! Nice and simple and completely your own!My son and I made this one together. He had his idea of all the colors he wanted in an outfit I was making for him, but we didn’t have orange, so we picked it up here in the scarf. And like I said, it’s all his (well, and mine too now!). His ideas, the colors he picked out and now it fits him perfectly! Much more fun than buying one already made. I hope you enjoy making one as much as we did!

Salad Spinner Turkeys Tutorial at MAM!

Please join me on the MAM blog today! I’m sharing a super fun and silly project that’s great to do today or even with the whole family while you’re waiting on the real turkey to cook on Thursday!

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You can try to make just one… But once the salad spinner is out… Good luck with just one!

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I’ll bet you’ll end up with a ‘rafter‘ (a little Turkey Day trivia for ya) of turkeys! Make as many as you want for your Thanksgiving table! How many will you make???

Envelope Pillow Tutorial at Go To Sew

This month over at Go To Sew, I’m sharing a quick and easy envelope pillow tutorial! A great gift idea…

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I made mine for a friend that wanted a St Louis Cardinal pillow…

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I’m not much for using fabrics with team logos and such, so I took their colors and logo and made mine.

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What do you think? Does it say St Louis Cardinals without literally saying St Louis Cardinals? I hope so! I didn’t do a bird. But I did baseballs (don’t look at the basballs too closely, it’s my first time doing little bitty circles!), the yellow bat and the blue outline…. Crossing my fingers that she likes it!

Be sure to check out the tutorial over at Go To Sew!

FrankenZombie Treat Bag Tutorial

Is it Frankenstein? Is it a zombie? No, It’s both! It’s FrankenZombie!!!!

Frankenzombie-ImFeelinCrafty-Title1It’s the FrankenZombie Treat Bag! The kiddo has a treat bag that he loves and doesn’t want to replace. We use it every year. And then I remembered the zombie birthday party invitation that he brought home the other day! So why not make a zombie gift bag that can then be used as a treat bag??? Oh yeah! So that’s what we did! Check out the tutorial over at Go To Sew!

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Sew Ready to Play Three Little Pigs with the Aesthetic Nest

I can’t believe another season of Sew Ready to Play is coming ot an end! Today’s guest is Anneliese  from the Aesthetic Nest where she blogs about the beautiful clothes she makes for her girls. She also knits and throws really beautiful parties! When I first found her I remember thinking about what beautiful style she has! The clothes she makes her girls look like they came from a high end boutique. Just fantastic! She also recently launched her own pattern line, Wee Muses Sewing Patterns, starting with the The Bateau Neck Top.

Welcome Annaliese!

Thank you, Louise, for inviting me to participate in this series. I always love a good challenge! My girls are young enough, and I guess I am impatient enough, that we don’t spend a lot of time with board games. Unless you count pulling out the pieces and using them for more imaginative play. We opt instead for coloring, crafts, legos and other things that involve creating or moving around.

But we love word games, songs and rhymes. Especially if they involve bouncing or tickling. “This Little Piggy Went to Market” is one of my favorite. Perhaps because I have played it on my babies’ toes when they were so young they were still learning to smile. And because crying “wee, wee, wee all the way home…” with a tickle still elicits loud laughs.

So I opted to sew something inspired by this English rhyme. I started with this gorgeous “Nursery Versery” linen fabric by Heather Ross for Kokka and a pattern I think of as classic and childlike.

But I wanted to come up with something more, and something to share, so I sewed a quilted Little Piggy Pouch complete with piggy appliques. Heather Ross’s illustrations of these five little piggies are so cute!

This is kind of a scrappy bag with a little bit of batting and some zigzag finished, exposed seam allowances. I put four little piggies on the front–the one who goes to market, the one who stays home, the one who has roast beef, and the one who has none–and the last little piggy, who cried “wee wee wee all the way home” on the back.

I thought Tess could recite the rhyme and point to the piggies on her bag and then play like the little pig and run him home…

…to the inside of the bag.

My Tess loves carrying bags of all types. This Little Piggy Pouch is a fun shape into which she can stick her arm hunting for treasures…

…like lollipops from her mother….

But it also would work to carry her small earnings to market, or for collecting things she finds on her way.

 Scale it down a bit and it would be a great pencil pouch too! Here’s the how-to.

THIS LITTLE PIGGY POUCH TUTORIAL

You’ll need:

  • 1/3 yard of two fabrics, one for the outside of the pouch and one for the inside (or fat quarters would work if the print is oriented the way you’d like it)
  • 1/3 yard of cotton quilt batting
  • 2 yards of 1/2″ single fold bias tape (purchased or made–this is used for the strap)
  • coordinating thread

The pouch is constructed with a back piece that folds over the front to form the flap. Cut out:

  • a back piece measuring 5.5″ wide and 12″ tall (cut 1 from your outer fabric, 1 from your inside fabric, and one from your batting)
  • a front piece measuring 5.5″ wide and 9.25″ tall (cut 1 from your outer fabric, 1 from your inside fabric, and one from your batting)

If you want to make this pencil-pouch sized, cut the back piece 4.5″ wide x 10.75″ tall and the front piece 4.5″wide x 8″ tall)

Round off the corners from the top edge of the back pieces. Fold them in half lengthwise and trim off the corners at once to make them symmetrical.

Create a stack of back pieces and a stack of front pieces in this order:

  • on top (facing you), the right side of the outer fabric
  • cotton batting
  • on the bottom, wrong side of the inner fabric

So you are sandwiching the cotton batting between the outer and inner fabrics with the wrong sides of these fabrics against the batting.

Stitch these stacks together by sewing around all sides using a .5″ seam allowance.

If you are using appliques now is the time to stitch them on.

I pinned on the appliques and used a zigzag stitch around the edges.

The batting gives these a nice bit of dimension.

Now zigzag stitch around the edges of your back and front pieces. I used the widest zigzag possible but not too tight as I wanted some of the raw edges to show.

Pin the front to the back “inside” fabric together, aligning the sides and bottom edge.

Stitch the bottom and sides together with a .5″ seam allowance.

To add the strap, take your 2 yards of bias tape and fold it in half to double it, with the folded edges against each other. It will now be 1 yard long. Zigzag stitch the entire length to finish it.

Now overlap the ends under the pouch flap. Place this right above the top of the front of the pouch. Be sure the loop of the strap isn’t twisted. Use a zigzag stitch to attach the strap to the pouch by sewing over the strap from one side of the pouch to the other.

Sew a buttonhole on the bottom of the front flap and sew on your favorite button.

Now you have a Little Piggy Pouch!

Sew Ready to Play Checkers with Sugar Bee Crafts

Today my special guest is Mandy from Sugar Bee Crafts! I’ve been following her blog for a long long time. I can’t even remember how I found out about it, but it doesn’t matter how. It matters that it’s very cool, with all sorts of sewing and craft projects. And some of my favorite sewing projects she does are her Halloween costumes! It’s not one costume here or there! It’s the whole family dressed as a theme! Love it! I can’t wait to see what they are planning for this Halloween! But in the meantime…..

Welcome Mandy!!

Hi Everyone!  I’m Mandy and I blog over at the super-cool blog, Sugar Bee Crafts - come see me over there!  I enjoy all things crafty, including sewing and games so of course I jumped at the chance to be a part of this series that puts the two together.  I tried to think of the most popular game at our house, which by far is checkers.  They all LOVE it!  And so I dreamed up the Checkers Skirt:

This would be super-easy to make if you had some large checkered fabric on hand.  But I didn’t.  It still wasn’t hard – let me walk you through it.

First I cut the black and the white fabric into 4 inch strips:

And I sewed them back together, alternating colors, like so:

Then, I turned those sewed strips on their side and again cut 4 inch strips, as shown:

Then I sewed those strips back together, being sure to stagger the black and white to make the checkerboard effect.  I cut off any excess to make a large rectangle and then sewed the short ends together (right sides together) to make a big tube/skirt form.

I made a casing at the top and inserted elastic:

And I serged (you could zig zag) the bottom hem and then covered it with some cute red lace as a fun accent:

For the pocket that plays off of a round checkerpiece, I cut 2 circles (just trace something you have sitting around, like a lid)

Then I sewed those two circles with right sides together, leaving an opening that is an inch or two wide.  Clip all around the seam to help it lay flatter, then turn the circle right-side out through the hole.

Sew it to the skirt, leaving the top of the circle unattached so that it will function as a pocket.

I love how it came out!!  Simple, but really makes a statement, and has a definite shout-out to our love of checkers!

Hope to see you over at Sugar Bee Crafts!

Craft Blogger

Sew Ready to Play Hi Ho Cherry-O with the Shaffer Sisters!

Hi Ho Cherry-O! I had totally forgotten about this game! It’s a good one, though. I’m going ot have to add to my kiddo’s Christmas list!

The last week of Sew Ready to Play is being kicked off by the lovely Al of the Shaffer Sisters! I was introduced to the sisters blog earlier this year when I almost participated in their series Make for Mom, but ended up not being able to participate in that round! But when I started checking the blog out I knew I had seen these ladies around the blogging world! Their pieces are fantastic! You’ve got to check out this adorable little suit!  Totally inspiring for me to make more clothes for my kiddo!

Welcome Al!

Hello Sew Ready to Play readers. I hope that today we might be able to inspire you as so many of the other participants have. My name is Al and I am the youngest member of the Shaffer Sisters. We are budget oriented and between the three of us we have 9 kids. We try to sew pieces in their wardrobes that we wouldn’t be able to afford otherwise and love to make delicious food.

I came here today to share something with you that was inspired with my three year old daughter in mind. Ty is outgoing, fun, and the ray of sunshine in my life. She loves games, but her favorite is Hi Ho Cherry-O because it is hands on and requires counting. The purpose of the game is to get all your cherries picked from the tree and into the bucket. As you’re filling the bucket a bird or dog may take your cherries or the bucket may get knocked over.

When Louise invited us to participate, I was so excited because I knew I had to run with a Hi Ho Cherry-O theme. I decided to use red, yellow, and blue for my base colors because they showed up throughout the game and brought back flashbacks to childhood and primary colors. It took days before I came up with the design of Hi Lo Cherry-O, but even still it was modified all the way up to the very end. Like my sister Jo says, “Never, never, never quit until it’s a masterpiece.”

My second to last design for this involved stamping and dying, but didn’t bring the bold on a budget look I love. What was supposed to be dyed a bright royal blue ended a light periwinkle. The cherry stamped fabric ended up looking more like a summer camp project than a clean, beautiful textile. In a state of emergency I sent a text to my sister, Scary, in the middle of the night and the next morning drove to her home to get moral support and a fresh twist on my design.

I had already designed and tested my pattern pieces for this dress when I made the Starburst dress, but I don’t really like to make the same thing more than once. So here I am with a modified pattern of the high-low dress. I turned the sleeves into side yokes and used a button enclosure in the front instead of a zipper in the back.  I color blocked the bodice of the dress in the shape of a bird’s head.

After the previous fabric fiasco I went through our fabric stash and selected a white-on-white polka dot fabric and picked up a royal blue cotton from JoAnn’s. Once the front of the dress was together, I took advantage of Scary’s background in embroidery and her willing and helping hands. After I sketched out the desired image on the fabric, Scary got to work placing a bird’s beak with two cherries hanging out of its mouth. She used a satin stitch which goes fairly quickly and can leave a big impact.

Running away from the photo-shoot to the nearest tree.
Apparently High Low Dresses are great for climbing trees too.

After I had the image on, I was only a few steps from completion and success. What do you think? If you’ve ever played the game Hi Ho Cherry-O it’s not hard to see the connection of the game to this Hi Lo Cherry-O Dress. Once she outgrows it I will pull this dress aside and put it in the pile of figurative jewels to someday fill her hope chest.

With Love,

Al

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